Kate Hogan -Amherst, MA real estate, Hadley, MA real estate, Northampton, MA real estate
Kate Hogan - Amherst & Pioneer Valley Realtor


Looking to add your home to the real estate market? Ultimately, you'll want to do everything you can to maximize the value of your residence.

For home sellers, getting the best price for a residence may seem virtually impossible at times. Fortunately, we're here to help you plan ahead so you can get the best price for your house as soon as it hits the market.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you optimize the value of your residence, regardless of the current real estate market's conditions.

1. Examine the Housing Market

When it comes to the real estate market, it is important to understand how your residence stacks up against the competition.

Collect housing market data to learn about the real estate sector. Then, you can establish a "competitive" price for your home and boost your chances of a quick home sale.

Typically, home sellers should look at the prices of currently available residences in their cities and towns. This will enable home sellers to understand the local real estate market and establish a price range for houses that are similar to their own.

Don't forget to review the prices of recently sold houses as well. With this housing market data in hand, home sellers can find out whether they are about to enter a seller's or buyer's market.

2. Complete a Home Appraisal

Let's face it – what your home is worth today is unlikely to match what you initially paid for your residence. If you have completed a wide range of home upgrades over the years, the value of your residence may have increased. Or, if you failed to maintain your house's interior and exterior, your residence's value may have fallen.

A home appraisal will enable you to learn about your house's strengths and weaknesses. This assessment is performed by a professional property inspector who will take a close look at your house's interior and exterior. After the assessment is finished, the property inspector will provide you with a report that can help you price your house appropriately.

If you want to boost your home's value after a home appraisal, you can always complete various home interior and exterior improvement projects. That way, you can enhance your house both inside and out and move closer to maximizing the value of your home.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent is a difference-maker for home sellers, and for good reason. This housing market professional will do everything possible to help you prep your house and ensure you can receive the best price for it – without exception.

Usually, a real estate agent will set up home showings and open houses, negotiate with homebuyers on your behalf and much more. He or she will even provide honest, unbiased home selling recommendations to ensure you can streamline the home selling journey.

Don't leave anything to chance as you get ready to add your house to the real estate market. Use these tips, and you should have no trouble getting the best price for your house.


Family members and friends are loved ones who play important roles in your life. However, when it comes to sharing the news that you've decided to sell your home, it sometimes can be difficult to prevent these loved from sabotaging your home sale.

Lucky for you, there are many simple ways to reduce the risk that loved ones can hinder your ability to sell your residence.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to keep family members and friends involved in the home selling process.

1. Meet with Family Members and Friends

Don't wait to inform family members and friends about your decision to sell your house. Instead, meet with loved ones so you can discuss your home selling plans with them.

Face-to-face meetings with family members and friends are ideal. These meetings will allow you to explain why you decided to sell your home, where you plan to move and much more.

In addition, meeting with family members and friends shows loved ones that you care about their thoughts and feelings. It also sets the stage to involve your loved ones in the home selling process – something that may help you get the best results possible.

2. Respond to Loved Ones' Home Selling Questions

In all likelihood, family members and friends will have lots of questions about your decision to sell your home. If you plan ahead for potential questions, you should have no trouble responding to loved ones' queries accordingly.

It may be tough to move further away from loved ones. But if you prepare before you meet with family members and friends, you can improve your chances of remaining calm, cool and collected as you share your home selling news.

Furthermore, it is important to remember that loved ones might not always agree with your home selling decision.

On the other hand, family members and friends should be ready to stick with you and support your decision, regardless of whether they agree with it. By doing so, your loved ones can provide you with the assistance you need to streamline the home selling process.

3. Discuss Your Options with a Real Estate Agent

For those who want to get their loved ones involved the home selling cycle, meeting with a real estate agent may prove to be a great first step.

A real estate agent can provide recommendations and suggestions about how to share your home selling news with family members and friends. Plus, this housing market professional can respond to your home selling concerns and queries at any time.

Perhaps best of all, a real estate agent will serve as a great guide throughout the home selling process. He or she will help you add your residence to the real estate market, promote your house to potential property buyers and negotiate with homebuyers on your behalf.

Don't worry about telling family members and friends about your decision to sell your house. Conversely, use these tips, and you can prevent your loved ones from sabotaging your home sale.


Finding the ideal home for your family's needs is no easy task, but if you stay organized and focused, the right property is sure to come along!

One of your most valuable resources in your search for a new home is an experienced real estate agent -- someone you trust and feel comfortable working with.

They'll not only set up appointments for you to visit homes in your desired price range and school district, but they'll also help keep you motivated, informed, and on track. Once you know and have shared your requirements (and "wish list") with them, your agent will be able to guide you on a path to finding the home that will best serve your needs -- both short- and longer term.

In addition to proximity to jobs, good schools, and childcare, you'll probably want to pick a location that's close to supermarkets, recreation areas, and major highways. If you have friends or family in the area, then that would also be a key consideration.

While your immediate needs are a good starting point for creating a checklist of requirements, it's also a good idea to give some thought to what you may need in the future. Plans to expand your family, possibly take care of aging parents, or adopt pets are all factors to consider when looking at prospective homes to buy.

If you have college-age children or recent graduates in the family, you might have to save room for them in your new house. Many grads need a couple more years of financial and moral support from their parents (not to mention home-cooked meals) before they're ready to venture out on their own. Houses with a finished basement, a separate in-law apartment, or even a guest cottage on the property are often well-suited for multigenerational households.

In many cases, people tend to buy a home based on their emotional reaction to it, and then justify the purchase with facts. For example, if the price was right and a particular house reminded you of your childhood home, then that combination of elements could prompt you to make an offer on the house -- assuming those childhood memories were happy!

Sometimes prospective buyers might simply love the look and feel of a neighborhood or the fact that there's a spacious, fenced-in back yard in which they can envision their children or dogs happily (and safely) playing.

According to recent surveys, today's buyers are attracted to homes that have energy efficient features, separate laundry rooms, and low-maintenance floors, counter tops, and backyard decks. Gourmet kitchens, stainless steel appliances, a farmhouse sink, a home office area, and outdoor living spaces are also popular features. Although your tastes may differ, many house hunters also like design elements such as subway tiles, hardwood floors, shaker cabinets, pendant lights, and exposed brick.

When it comes to choosing the home that you and your family will live in for the next few years, your top priorities will probably include a sufficient amount of space, plenty of convenience, and a comfortable environment in which you and your loved ones can feel safe, secure, and happy for the foreseeable future!


A small town home initially may have proven to be ideal. But if your current small town house fails to meet your needs, there is no need to worry. In fact, you can add your small town residence to the local housing market and relocate to a new city or town at your convenience.

Ultimately, there are many reasons why now may be the right time to sell your small town house. These include:

1. Your small town home no longer suits your present lifestyle.

If your small town home has become too big or too small for you, it may be beneficial to list your residence. That way, you can sell your current small town home and upgrade or downgrade as needed.

Before you list a small town residence, it generally is a good idea to study the local housing market. If you allocate time and resources to analyze housing market data, you can identify home selling patterns and trends. Then, you can use this information to establish a competitive initial asking price for your small town home – something that may help you accelerate the property selling journey.

2. Your small town home is far away from family members and friends.

If you find that you have to commute several hours to visit family members and friends, it is important to remember that you can always move closer to these loved ones. By selling your small town home, you can relocate near family members and friends any time you choose.

For those who want to sell a small town home and move close to family members and friends, it helps to plan accordingly. You should craft a strategy to sell your current residence as well as determine where you are going to live going forward. This will allow you to map out any home selling and homebuying plans and take the necessary steps to put your plans into action.

3. Your small town home fails to provide convenient access to attractions and landmarks.

If you enjoy lots of big-name attractions and landmarks, small town living may not be the right choice. Fortunately, city residences are available that provide quick, easy access to many entertainment options. And if you sell your small town home, you can pursue a city house that delivers convenient access to your preferred attractions and landmarks.

As you get set to sell your small town home, you may want to employ a real estate agent too. This housing market professional will learn about you and your house selling goals and craft a custom home selling strategy for you. Plus, a real estate agent will promote your small town home to prospective buyers, set up property showings and do everything possible to ensure you can maximize your home sale earnings.

Remove the guesswork commonly associated with listing a small town home. Hire a real estate agent, and you can receive in-depth assistance as you sell your small town residence.


Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

If you've recently made the decision to put your home on the market in the near future, you're probably already aware that the Millennial generation has a reputation for being a bit different from their counterparts of the past. For instance, you may have heard that this generation is putting off home ownership longer than any of their predecessors and that they've got quirky requirements such as walkable urban locations. Although you can't help where your home is situated, there are other things you can do to make your home more attractive to Millennials. Here's what you can do:

Create a Low Maintenance Yard

Although many Millennials have discovered the joy of gardening, their efforts are going more to growing at least some of their own food rather than maintaining a fussy ornamental landscape. Vast lawns don't appeal to them, and neither do high-maintenance trees and shrubbery. Consider replacing much of your lawn with a low-maintenance rock garden and eliminating any feature that requires significant time and attention.

Create an Appealing Online Presence

Millennial Buyers are far more likely to decide to view specific properties as the result of gaining a favorable impression of them online than seeing them listed in a newspaper or in a real estate agent's brochure. You'll need professional quality photographs to show off your home in its best light online, but don't stop there -- Millennials want to see videos as well. 

Create a Home Office 

A designated home office is another feature that won't fail to appeal to Millennial buyers. Many of them spend at least part of their time working from home, so if you don't already have a designated home office, consider converting one of the bedrooms to one. Choose a room with plenty of natural lighting if possible. 

Create Energy Efficiency

Eco-conscious Millennials appreciate energy efficiency because it's compatible with their principles, but because their idealism is tempered with a pragmatic side, they also appreciate the cost-savings involved with energy efficient features. Consider having solar panels, on-demand hot water heaters, or other green features installed. 

Create a Smart Home

As the first generation completely raised in the digital age, many Millennials consider smart home technology to be more of a necessity than a luxury. Temperature modulation, security, and lighting are three of the most common in-home smart technologies, but they can also be used to water the lawn and garden area, activate laundry machines, and put cleaning robots to work. 

It's also a good idea to be prepared to speak at some length with Millennials come to see your home about the quality and availability of WiFi service. Remembering that their generation may have different needs and preferences than you will help ensure smooth sailing after you put your home on the market. 




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